Planet maemo

Enrique Ocaña González

This is the last post of the series showing interesting debugging tools, I hope you have found it useful. Don’t miss the custom scripts at the bottom to process GStreamer logs, help you highlight the interesting parts and find the root cause of difficult bugs. Here are also the previous posts of the series:

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Categories: Gnome
Enrique Ocaña González

In this new post series, I’ll show you how both existing and ad-hoc tools can be helpful to find the root cause of some problems. Here are also the older posts of this series in case you find them useful:

Use strace to know which config/library files are used by a program

If you’re becoming crazy supposing that the program should use some config and it seems to ignore it, just use strace to check what config files, libraries or other kind of files is the program actually using. Use the grep rules you need to refine the search:

$ strace -f -e trace=%file nano 2> >(grep 'nanorc')
access("/etc/nanorc", R_OK)             = 0
access("/usr/share/nano/javascript.nanorc", R_OK) = 0
access("/usr/share/nano/gentoo.nanorc", R_OK) = 0
...

Know which process is killing another one

First, try to strace -e trace=signal -p 1234 the killed process.

If that doesn’t work (eg: because it’s being killed with the uncatchable SIGKILL signal), then you can resort to modifying the kernel source code (signal.c) to log the calls to kill():

SYSCALL_DEFINE2(kill, pid_t, pid, int, sig)
{
    struct task_struct *tsk_p;
    ...
    /* Log SIGKILL */
    if (sig & 0x1F == 9) {
        tsk_p = find_task_by_vpid(pid);

        if (tsk_p) {
            printk(KERN_DEBUG "Sig: %d from pid: %d (%s) to pid: %d (%s)\n",
                sig, current->pid, current->comm, pid, tsk_p->comm);
        } else {
            printk(KERN_DEBUG "Sig: %d from pid: %d (%s) to pid: %d\n",
                sig, current->pid, current->comm, pid);
        }
    }
    ...
}

Wrap gcc/ld/make to tweak build parameters

If you ever find yourself with little time in front of a stubborn build system and, no matter what you try, you can’t get the right flags to the compiler, think about putting something (a wrapper) between the build system and the compiler. Example for g++:

#!/bin/bash
main() {
    # Build up arg[] array with all options to be passed
    # to subcommand.
    i=0
    for opt in "$@"; do
        case "$opt" in
        -O2) ;; # Removes this option
        *)
            arg[i]="$opt" # Keeps the others
            i=$((i+1))
            ;;
        esac
    done
    EXTRA_FLAGS="-O0" # Adds extra option
    echo "g++ ${EXTRA_FLAGS} ${arg[@]}" # >> /tmp/build.log # Logs the command
    /usr/bin/ccache g++ ${EXTRA_FLAGS} "${arg[@]}" # Runs the command
}
main "$@"

Make sure that the wrappers appear earlier than the real commands in your PATH.

The make wrapper can also call remake instead. Remake is fully compatible with make but has features to help debugging compilation and makefile errors.

Analyze the structure of MP4 data

The ISOBMFF Box Structure Viewer online tool allows you to upload an MP4 file and explore its structure.

Categories: Gnome
madman2k

Mould King 13106 Forklift Report

2021-05-13 17:11 UTC  by  madman2k
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YouTube Video

I got myself the MouldKing Forklift MOC set and wanted to share my findings with you.

The set comes with “New PowerModule 4.0″, which means it supports continuous output. If you get the new joystick controller or use the app, you can have smooth controls of the motors and not just binary 0% or 100% throttle as with the standard remote.

As you can see, I actually put on some of the stickers. Some purists never do anything like this, because they argue that after some time the stickers start peeling off and look used. This is certainly a good point if you are building a sports-car – with a Forklift however, I would argue used stickers add to the looks.

Manual errata & comments

Generally, I prefer the Mould King manual to the original by Kevin Moo as I like renderings more than photographs. However, its nice to have the original at hand if something looks fishy. While building, I noticed the following:

Step 34: Cable-management is almost completely skipped in the manual. I laid all cables through the opening behind the threads. This keeps them out of the way later. The fiddle through the cables of the motors, that you add at steps 52 & 55.

Step 100: The battery-box position is wrong. It will collide with the bar you added at step 96. To make it fit, just rotate the battery-box by 180°.

Also, the direction of motor A has to be reversed. Press and hold left-shoulder, up and down for 3 seconds for this.

Step 111: The arms that you added in steps 89/ 90 should be oriented upwards to hold the footstep.

Step 143: Use a black bush instead of the 2-pin-axle beam, so things look symmetrical. This is a leftover from the original MOC, which squashed the IR receiver in there.

Step 214: I suggest using gray 2-axles at step 230 instead of the suggested whites. This way the front facing axes will be all gray. For this just use white 2-axles here. Those wont be visible at all anyway.

Step 277: When adding the fork to the lift-arm, make sure that it has as much play as possible. Otherwise the fork will get stuck when moved all the way up.

Step 278: Do not fix the threads yet. Wait until the end so you can correctly measure the lowest position of the fork (which gives you the length of the threads).

Step 286: Make sure that the 3-pin pops out towards the 8-axle. This will make joining things at step 288 much easier.

Categories: Articles
Enrique Ocaña González

This is the last post on the instrumenting source code series. I hope you to find the tricks below as useful as the previous ones.

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Categories: Gnome
madman2k

Comparing water filters

2021-05-07 18:08 UTC  by  madman2k
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Lets say, you want to reduce the water carbonate hardness because you got a shiny coffee machine and descaling that is a time-consuming mess.

If you dont happen to run a coffee-shop, using a water-jug is totally sufficient for this. Unfortunately, while the jug itself is quite cheap, the filters you need will cost you an arm and a leg – similar to how the printer-ink business works.

The setup

Here, we want to look at the different filter options and compare their performance. The contenders are

NamePricingBrita Classic~15.19 €PearlCo Classic12.90 €PearlCo Protect+15.90 €

As said initially, the primary goal of using these filters is to reduce the water carbonate – any other changes, like pH mythology, will not be considered.

To measure the performance in this regard, I am using a digital total dissolved solid meter – just like the one used in the Wikipedia article. To make the measurement robust against environmental variations, I am not only measuring the PPM in the filtered water, but also in the tap water before filtering. The main indicator is then the reduction factor.

Also, you are not using the filter only once, so I repeat the measuring over the course of 37 days. Why 37? Well, most filters are specified for 30 days of usage – but I want to see how much cushion we got there.

So – without further ado – the results:

Results

NameØ PPM reductionØ absolute PPMBrita Classic31%206PearlCo Classic24%218PearlCo Protect+32%191

As motivated above, the difference in absolute PPM can be explained by environmental variation – after all the measurements took place over the course of more than 3 months.

However, we see that the pricing difference is indeed reflected by filtering performance. By paying ~20% more, you get a ~30% higher PPM reduction.

The only thing missing, is the time-series to see beyond 30 days:

As you can see, the filtering performance is continuously declining after a peak at about 10-15 days of use.

And for completeness, the absolute PPM values:

Categories: Articles
Enrique Ocaña González

In this post I show some more useful debugging tricks. Check also the other posts of the series:

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Categories: Gnome
Enrique Ocaña González

This is the continuation of the GStreamer WebKit debugging tricks post series. In the next three posts, I’ll focus on what we can get by doing some little changes to the source code for debugging purposes (known as “instrumenting”), but before, you might want to check the previous posts of the series:

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Categories: Gnome
Enrique Ocaña González

This post is a continuation of a series of blog posts about the most interesting debugging tricks I’ve found while working on GStreamer WebKit on embedded devices. These are the other posts of the series published so far:

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Categories: Gnome
Enrique Ocaña González

I’ve been developing and debugging desktop and mobile applications on embedded devices over the last decade or so. The main part of this period I’ve been focused on the multimedia side of the WebKit ports using GStreamer, an area that is a mix of C (glib, GObject and GStreamer) and C++ (WebKit).

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Categories: Gnome
Thomas Perl

This depends on Bounce (the N900 .deb) and SDL 1.2 being installed. Google "bounce_1.0.0_armel.deb" for the former, and use n9repomirror for the latter.

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Alberto Mardegan

This is the second part of my porting odyssey; for the first part, follow this link.

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Categories: energia
Alberto Mardegan

In case you have a sense of deja-vu when reading this post, it's because indeed this is not the first time I try porting a device to Ubuntu Touch. The previous attempt, however, was with another phone model (and manufacturer), and did not have a happy ending. This time it went better, although the real ending is still far away; but at least I have something to celebrate.

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Categories: energia