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madman2k

On OGRE versions

2016-08-05 12:24 UTC  by  madman2k
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Currently one can choose between the following OGRE versions
1.9, 1.10, 2.0 and 2.1

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Creating PyGTK app snaps with snapcraft

2016-07-09 13:45 UTC  by  madman2k
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Snap is a new packaging format introduced by Ubuntu as an successor to dpkg aka debian package. It offers sandboxing and transactional updates and thus is a competitor to the flatpak format and resembles docker images.

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Introducing the OGRE fork on GitHub

2016-05-02 14:38 UTC  by  madman2k
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in this post I want to introduce the OGRE fork on github. The goal of the fork is to provide a stable and reliable OGRE 1.x series while at the same time modernizing parts under the hood updates.

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Learning Modern 3D Graphics Programming

2015-12-29 22:26 UTC  by  madman2k
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one of the best resources to learn modern OpenGL and the one which helped me quite a lot is the Book at www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/ – or lets better say was. Unfortunately the domain expired so the content is no longer reachable.

Luckily the Book was designed as an open source project and the code to generate the website is still available at Bitbucket. Unfortunately this repository does not seem to be actively maintained any more.

Therefore I set out to make the Book to be available again using Github Pages. You can find the results here:

https://paroj.github.io/gltut/

However I did not simply mirror the pages, but also improved it at several places. So what has changed so far?

  • converted mathematical expressions from SVG to inline MathML. This does not only improve readability in browsers, but also fixes broken math symbols when generating the PDF.
  • replace XSLTHL by highlight.js for better syntax highlighting
  • added fork me on github badge to website to visualize that one can easily contribute
  • enabled the Optimization Appendix. While it is not complete, it already provides some useful tips and maybe encourages contributions.
  • updated the Documentation build to work on Linux
  • added instructions how to Build the website/ PDF Docs

hopefully these changes will generate some momentum so this great Book gets extended again. As there were also non-cosmetical changes like the new Chapter I also tagged a 0.3.9 release.

I the process of the above work I found out that there is also a mirror of the original Book at http://alfonse.bitbucket.org/oldtut/. This one is however at the state of the 0.3.8 release, meaning it does not only misses the above changes but also some adjustment happened post 0.3.8 at bitbucket.

Categories: News
madman2k

UEFI is the successor to BIOS for communicating with the Firmware on your Mainboard.
While the first BIOS was released with the IBM-PC in 1981, the first UEFI version (EFI 2.0) was released 25 years later in 2006 building upon the lessons learned in that timespan. So UEFI is without any doubt the more modern solution.

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Updating Crucial MX100 Firmware with Ubuntu

2015-04-10 20:14 UTC  by  madman2k
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There has been a Firmware update for the Crucial MX100 to MU02. In case you are running Ubuntu there is an easy way to perform the update without using a CD or USB Stick.

As the firmware comes in form of an iso image containing Tiny Core Linux, we can instruct grub2 to directly boot from it. Here is how:

  1. append the following to /etc/grub.d/40_custom:
    menuentry "MX100 FW Update" {
     set isofile="/home/<USERNAME>/Downloads/MX100_MU02_BOOTABLE_ALL_CAP.iso"
     # assuming your home is on /dev/sda3 ATTENTION: change this so it matches your setup
     loopback loop (hd0,msdos3)$isofile
     linux (loop)/boot/vmlinuz libata.allow_tpm=1 quiet base loglevel=3 waitusb=10 superuser rssd-fw-update rssd-fwdir=/opt/firmware rssd-model=MX100
     initrd (loop)/boot/core.gz
    }

    read this for details of the file format.

  2. run sudo update-grub
  3. reboot and select “MX100 FW Update”
  4. Now you can delete the menuentry created in step1

Note that this actually much “cleaner” than using windows where you have to download 150MB of the Crucial Store Executive Software which actually is a local webserver written in Java (urgh!). But all it can do is display some SMART monitoring information and automatically perform the above steps on windows.

Header Image CC-by MiNe

Categories: Articles
madman2k

If you want to get your Xbox One/ Xbox 360 running on ubuntu you basically have the choice between the in-kernel xpad driver and the userspace xboxdrv driver.

Most of the guides recommend using xboxdrv as xpad has been stagnating. However using xboxdrv has some disadvantages; as it runs as a daemon in userspace you have to manually take care of starting/ stopping it and giving your user access to the virtual devices it creates.
Xpad on the other hand just works as any other linux driver directly inside the kernel which is more  efficient and hassle free.

Fortunately while pushing SteamOS Valve has updated the xpad driver bringing it on par with xboxdrv:

  • they added support for Xbox One Controller
  • they fixed the communication protocol – no more blinking controller light

Update July 22, 2015

Unfortunately there are still several issues with the SteamOS driver. This follow-up post discusses them and the solutions in detail.

The bottom line is that I updated the official linux driver with chunks found in the SteamOS driver, as well as in several patches floating around the internet. Code and install instructions are available at Github.

Categories: News
madman2k

How to manually update a deb package from source

2014-03-15 12:03 UTC  by  madman2k
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Probably everyone has encountered a package in Ubuntu which was not the newest released version while one for some reason needed the newest one. The first step is to search for a PPA with the desired version. But what if there is no such PPA or you want to build the version yourself? This is where this guide comes in. Note however that this is not aimed at ordinary users – you need some experience with programming/ compiling to successfully build a package.

Before you start

Before you start make sure that you have source packages enabled in your software sources.
Next you obviously need the upstream source tar-ball of the new program which should look something like <packagename><version>.tar.gz.
Download this tar-ball to a new directory <somedir> and extract it there.

Updating Package info

For the following commands I assume you are in the previously created directory <somedir>.

First we need to get the old version of the source package

apt-get source <packagename>

This will download and extract the old source package into <packagename><oldversion>.

Now we need some helper scripts to perform the upgrading as well as the build-time dependencies of the package

sudo apt-get install dpkg-dev devscripts fakeroot
sudo apt-get build-dep <packagename>

Next change into the extracted sources of the old package and update the packaging

cd <packagename>-<oldversion>
uupdate -v <newversion> ../<packagename>-<newversion>.tar.gz

# change into the extracted new package
cd ../<packagename>-<newversion>

# update version info
dch -l ~ppa -D $(lsb_release -sc)

For more information see the Debian New Maintainers Guide.

Building the program

To trigger a rebuild of the program simply execute

dpkg-buildpackage
Uploading your version to a PPA

To upload a package to a PPA you first need to sign it to prove that you are the author. To do this you have to execute the following in the <packagename><newversion> directory

debuild -S

Furthermore you need the upload tool dput to actually perform the uploading

sudo apt-get install dput

Now change to <somedir> and execute

dput ppa:<your_username>/<repository> <source.changes>

You can find more information at Launchpad.

Categories: News
madman2k

Secure Owncloud setup

2014-02-22 10:53 UTC  by  madman2k
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While the Owncloud Manual suggests enabling SSL, it unfortunately does not go into detail how to get a secure setup. The core problem is that the default SSL settings of Apache are not sane as in they do not enforce strong encryption. Furthermore the used default certificate will not match your server name and produce errors in the browser.

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How to root Android using Ubuntu

2014-01-12 13:14 UTC  by  madman2k
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The Big Picture

Android consists of three parts relevant to rooting

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madman2k

I recently ran into this problem and could not find any good solution on the Internet. So next comes a small summary of the problem with hopefully enough buzzwords, so Google can lead you here.

If you want to do C++ development on Android, you need the NDK for cross compilation. It comes by default with its own build system called ndk-build, which basically is a bunch of custom makefiles. But if you are sharing code between the Android Platform and lets say plain Linux, you have likely already a build system installed. For C/C++ CMake is quite popular as it supports different platforms and compilers. Fortunately there is already a project which adds Android support to CMake. I will not cover that – instead I assume you are using it already.

Unfortunately you cant use the ndk-gdb script supplied with the NDK to debug your application as it relies on the behaviour of ndk-build. But as said earlier, ndk-build is no wizardy, but just a bunch of scripts. So it is possible to emulate the behaviour using CMake, as following:

Add the following macro to your CMakeLists.txt file

macro(ndk_gdb_debuggable TARGET_NAME)
    get_property(TARGET_LOCATION TARGET ${TARGET_NAME} PROPERTY LOCATION)
    
    # create custom target that depends on the real target so it gets executed afterwards
    add_custom_target(NDK_GDB ALL) 
    add_dependencies(NDK_GDB ${TARGET_NAME})
    
    set(GDB_SOLIB_PATH ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR}/obj/local/${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}/)
    
    # 1. generate essential Android Makefiles
    file(WRITE ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR}/jni/Android.mk "APP_ABI := ${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}\n")
    file(WRITE ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR}/jni/Application.mk "APP_ABI := ${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}\n")

    # 2. generate gdb.setup
    get_directory_property(PROJECT_INCLUDES DIRECTORY ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR} INCLUDE_DIRECTORIES)
    string(REGEX REPLACE ";" " " PROJECT_INCLUDES "${PROJECT_INCLUDES}")
    file(WRITE ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR}/libs/${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}/gdb.setup "set solib-search-path ${GDB_SOLIB_PATH}\n")
    file(APPEND ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR}/libs/${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}/gdb.setup "directory ${PROJECT_INCLUDES}\n")

    # 3. copy gdbserver executable
    file(COPY ${ANDROID_NDK}/prebuilt/android-arm/gdbserver/gdbserver DESTINATION ${PROJECT_SOURCE_DIR}/libs/${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}/)

    # 4. copy lib to obj
    add_custom_command(TARGET NDK_GDB POST_BUILD COMMAND mkdir -p ${GDB_SOLIB_PATH})
    add_custom_command(TARGET NDK_GDB POST_BUILD COMMAND cp ${TARGET_LOCATION} ${GDB_SOLIB_PATH})

    # 5. strip symbols
    add_custom_command(TARGET NDK_GDB POST_BUILD COMMAND ${CMAKE_STRIP} ${TARGET_LOCATION})
endmacro()

Then use it like

add_library(YourTarget ...)
ndk_gdb_debuggable(YourTarget)

You should now be able to use ndk-gdb with CMake, just as if you would have used ndk-build.

Note that steps 4 and 5 are optional for debugging. They just reduce the size of the library that has to be transferred to the device. If you dont care, you can just leave them out. But then the solib search path from step 2 must be set to:

file(WRITE ./libs/${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}/gdb.setup "set solib-search-path ./libs/${ANDROID_NDK_ABI_NAME}\n")

Ideally someone should integrate that in the Android toolchain linked above.

Update Merged Upstream

Categories: Articles
madman2k

GNOME Project suffering the NIH disease

2011-12-10 14:03 UTC  by  madman2k
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When I first read about GNOME dropping support for BSD and Solaris, my impression was that this is a good idea to aiming to unify limit resources and get the work done. I was also excited about the idea of the GNOME OS. I think it is necessary to keep the big picture in mind when developing the different components. Previously Ubuntu was the only project that did this and it was also the reason why I started using Ubuntu. Because it made the different parts of Linux work together to achieve the big goal of a great overall system.

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